cmclibraryteen

paperbackd:

It’s November 1st, which means that NaNoWriMo 2013 has officially begun!  Here’s a few of the most successful YA books which started off as NaNoWriMo projects:

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan

Crewel by Gennifer Albin

Born of Illusion by Teri Brown

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Cinder by Marissa Meyer

A complete list of published NaNoWriMo novels can be found here.  Good luck to anyone participating in NaNoWriMo this year!

chicagopubliclibrary
chicagopubliclibrary:

Library Shelves That Are Meant To Be Climbed
From PSFK:

Created by Monterrey-based firm Anagrama, the library in Conarte was designed to encourage children to love reading and learning.
The library was commissioned by Nuevo León’s Regional Council for Culture and Art and is located in Fundidora Park, which used to be a steelworks and foundry and was converted to a complex with gardens, museums, theme parks, convention centers, auditoriums, and cultural venues like the Conarte.
The site for the library is an old warehouse-like building and Anagrama took into consideration the ‘untouchable’ nature of the building and improve it aesthetically.
The library is designed to reflect the mountainous features of Monterrey itself, with geometric shelving that double as storage for books and as space for children to play with or without books. The bookshelves are covered in carpeting and kids can clamber over them and have fun while playing, learning or reading.
Anagrama also used bright colors to liven up the space and encourage imagination.

Click here to see more photos of Anagrama’s library in Conarte!

chicagopubliclibrary:

Library Shelves That Are Meant To Be Climbed

From PSFK:

Created by Monterrey-based firm Anagrama, the library in Conarte was designed to encourage children to love reading and learning.

The library was commissioned by Nuevo León’s Regional Council for Culture and Art and is located in Fundidora Park, which used to be a steelworks and foundry and was converted to a complex with gardens, museums, theme parks, convention centers, auditoriums, and cultural venues like the Conarte.

The site for the library is an old warehouse-like building and Anagrama took into consideration the ‘untouchable’ nature of the building and improve it aesthetically.

The library is designed to reflect the mountainous features of Monterrey itself, with geometric shelving that double as storage for books and as space for children to play with or without books. The bookshelves are covered in carpeting and kids can clamber over them and have fun while playing, learning or reading.

Anagrama also used bright colors to liven up the space and encourage imagination.

Click here to see more photos of Anagrama’s library in Conarte!

brkteenlib

brkteenlib:

Take a class with me!  I’m teaching new Teen Lit Boot Camp continuing education classes this fall for the Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science. 

Starting November 1st (but there’s definitely still time to register!) I’m expanding my presentation from the YALSA Young Adult Literature Symposium (see a preview over here) to investigate the world of teen literature as it intersects with fan culture (fan fiction, fan art, etc.)  It promises to be a lot of fun, plus highlighting an often misunderstood but very common way teens interact with their favorite books, authors, and imaginary worlds.

If you’re interested in signing up, please do so ASAP!  The more students we have, the better the discussion, always!

You can find out more about, and register for, the classes here.

The reading list for nonfiction in November is as follows:

Teen Lit Boot Camp: Fanworks and Teen Literature

  • Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell
  • Hawkeye: My Life as a Weapon by Matt Fraction and David Aja

In anticipation of the fact that we will also be reading and looking at a look at fan creations (including fanfiction, fanvids, fancomics, and fan art) based on pop culture sources, before the class begins I suggest your refresh your memory on the basic plots, characters, and style of the following popular inspirations:

  • Harry Potter (books and films)
  • Sherlock Holmes (short stories and books)
  • Arthurian legends (as well as the modern BBC retelling, Merlin)
  • The works of Jane Austen (books)
  • Star Trek (Original series and the 2009 reboot)
  • Inception (film)
  • The Avengers (film)

Please don’t feel like you have to re-read or re-watch all of these titles, but I wanted to give potential students the heads up to check out the basics on any of these they may not have read or seen.  A wikipedia plot summary may be all you need to refresh your memory!

The reading lists for this and all upcoming courses live online here.  You can also check out the past reading lists to get a sense of what we read for each course.

Do let me know if you have any questions!

Please note: The two pages featured above are from the amazing Faith Erin Hicks (the graphic novelist responsible for the awesome Friends with Boys and Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong) and you can read her full 5-page fancomic for Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games over here. Also, raise your hand if you wish Faith could do the entire adaptation. *waves hand around above my head*

nypl

nypl:

"In an old house in Paris that was covered in vines, lived twelve little girls in two straight lines …" Three-year-old Lila and forever young Ashley share their love of the free-spirited Madeline from the titular series by Ludwig Bemelmans

Disclaimer: By sending us your photographs, you are giving the Library permission to post them online, so make sure that they’re your photos and that you have the authority to grant permission. Also, by submitting an image via email, you certify that you’re 18 years or older and accept the Library’s policy on Patron-Generated Content outlined in its privacy policy

readinginthestarlight

readinginthestarlight:

Lilliachip and I made a banned books display for our school library.  I’ve been meaning to get pictures up for weeks.  We made little paper chains and bars and one of the librarians got us real caution tape.  It’s the first display I’ve put together and I can’t wait to put together more!  Anyways, my 2 favorite books in the display are The Dictionary (banned because of “questionable” entries) and Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do you See? by Eric Carl (banned because a Marxist author has the same name and no one bothered to check if they were the same person).